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Error 1303 The installer has insufficient privileges to access this directory – Upgrade from App Volumes 2.12 to 2.12.1

12 Apr

With the latest version of App Volumes 2.12.1, you don’t have to uninstall the older version of App Volumes Manager. The latest App Volumes Manager 2.12.1 installer takes care of uninstalling, fresh-install and retain all the configuration details and settings automatically for you.

During the upgrade I encountered the following error:

“Error 1303. The installer has insufficient privileges to access this directory: C:\Program Files(x86)\CloudVolumes\Manager\log. The installation cannot continue. Log on as an administrator or contact your system administrator.”

App Volumes Upgrade Error

Resolution:
In our scenario we have VMware vRealize Log Insight Agent installed on the App Volumes Manager VM’s which is doing Syslog. The Log Insight agent captures the logs(production.log) inside the folder “C:\Program Files(x86)\CloudVolumes\Manager\log”. As the service is in the running state, it didn’t allow the folder to delete and left a ghost folder on the filesystem.

Log Insight Agent Service

After going into the services.msc and stopping the VMware vRealize Log Insight Agent service and click Retry, the setup manages to complete the upgrade successfully.

I hope this workaround helps you during your upgrade if you encounter a similar error message.

Thanks,
Aresh

Export Writable Volumes from vSAN Datastore

15 Nov
In certain scenarios such as uploading the Writable Volumes *.vmdk to VMware support team to analyze issues due to Writable Volumes or you simply want to export the WV from one vSAN datastore to another vCenter or vSAN Datastore
Following is the step by step procedure to export Writable Volumes from vsanDatastore for troubleshooting purposes:

Source vCenter or vSAN Datastore:

  • Create a dummy VM (No need to power on the VM)
  • Add a HDD to the dummy VM – Use existing disk option – Locate the Writable Volumes under –  /vmfs/volumes/vsandatastore/cloudvolumes/writables) and click OK
  • Now you can export the dummy VM as a OVA or OVF to another vCenter or vSAN datastore
  • Save the OVA to a File Share or GSS FPT for further troubleshooting

Target vCenter or vSAN Datastore

  • Import the OVA into the target vCenter
  • SSH to a host in the cluster from which the Writable Volumes (WV vmdk) needs to be copied to the correct path cd /vmfs/volumes/vsandatastore/cloudvolumes/writables
  • Copy the files *.vmdk from dummy VM Folder to the writable folder
    • cp /vmfs/volumes/DummyVM/AV-WV/domainname!5C.aresh.vmdk /vmfs/volumes/vsandatastore/cloudvolumes/writable
  • Go to App Volumes Manager – Writable Volumes – Import Writable Volumes
  • Now you should see the writable for that user
Following are the step the engineer needs to perform for further troubleshooting it can be GSS, R&D or L3.
  • Import the template into the environment
  • Click on convert to virtual machine
  • On any existing Windows 7 VM without AV Agent (make sure not AV agent is installed). One needs to have a Windows 7 VM pre-build
  • Add HDD and select the existing disk option. Search for the vmdk in the folder previously imported
  • Assign the volume a driver letter and you can browse the contents of the WV
  • Troubleshoot further!

I hope this post will save you a lot of time when exporting WV from VSAN Datastore

Thanks,
Aresh

Solving Microsoft Outlook (.OST) issues by combing VMware UEM and App Volumes

28 Jun

The long outstanding challenge of Microsoft Outlook *.ost files within Windows 7/8/10 floating desktops. Using VMware User Environment Management (UEM) and App Volumes together can overcome this challenge. Microsoft never supported or recommended keeping .ost files on File Shares and with O365 into equation the .ost file could be enormous sizes and would be unable to provide optimal end-user experience like you would be running from your PC devices.

App Volumes

  • Writable Volumes with the User Installed Applications template will be used to store the Outlook .ost and profile configuration details (.xml)
  • The .ost is stored within the writable volumes. Hence there is no performance impact like storing it on remote file shares
  • Depending upon the mailbox sizes you can create larger custom Writable Volumes – UIA template (The default template in AV is 10 GB). Like in O365 scenarios its normal to have 25GB mailbox size. Customer can create larger WV depending upon the requirements

UEM

  • Use the ADMX based setting for the Microsoft Office 2013/2016 cache settings. Policy – Default location for OST files
  • The most import step here is to point the .ost location to “C:\Snapvolumestemp\writable\Outlook”. Note this path is not virtualized, there is no over ahead of the filter driver

Using this technique, we can now quickly re-direct the .ost files to writable volumes and continue offering floating desktops to our end-users

There is also a VMware UEM video which demonstrates this steps in more details here – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bzy4X5xbURY (Thanks to Pim Vandeis from the UEM team)

Thanks,
Aresh